Archive for the ‘SwiftUI’ Category

SwiftUI: Modal presentation

I have regrettably little time to devote to SwiftUI. I explore when I can, although I wish I were a lot further in that journey.

Here’s my latest go, where I’m looking to build a modal presentation. Today is the first time I’ve been able to play with Modal, the storage type for a modal presentation. I tied it together with an isPresented state, but I’m wondering if I’ve done this all wrong.

I can’t help but think there’s a better way to do this. I’m using a text button for “Done” instead of a system-supplied item, so it won’t be automatically internationalized. Nor, can I find any specialty “Done” item in SFSymbols. When looking at Apple’s samples, such as Working with UI Controls, I see the same Text("Done") . While I know that Text elements are automatically localized should resources be available, is SwiftUI providing us with any core dictionary of terms?

I think using the isPresented state in the code below may be too clunky. I’d think that there would be a more direct way to coordinate a modal item. Any advice and guidance will be greatly welcomed.

I remain stuck in Mojave for most of my work, although I put an install of Catalina on a laptop. Although you can build proper SwiftUI apps using the beta Xcode, without the preview (and I’ve had no luck finding a secret default to enable it under Mojave) makes the experience way slower than working in a playground.

I’m hoping to dive next into Interfacing with UIKit.

SwiftUI: Boing!

Source: here

Note that you add the animation to the View object and update the view’s state in the gesture state handlers. The onEnded action passes a summary of the velocity, offset, and location of the gesture but I ignored it because I didn’t need it.

SwiftUI: Embracing the nonobvious?

This is going to be another day where I get to play with SwiftUI because I can’t get any real work done right now and am dealing with lots of interruptions.

This morning, I returned to yesterday’s mouse inventory sample to try to get my rounded corners working. Several people suggested that I implement my interface using a ZStack and a Rectangle, so I tried that first.

To my surprise, the Rectangle expanded my VStack and I haven’t to date figured out how to constrain its size to be no more than its sibling. I wanted the rectangle to grow weakly instead of pushing the title and total items towards the edge of the parent view, the way it did in this screenshot:

Here’s what it looks like without the monster-sized Rectangle, which I think is a much more appealing layout:

So instead, after messing around a bit, it occurred to me that everything is a view or at least everything is kind of view-ish and if so, then I could possibly apply my corner rounding to Color, which I did.

}.padding()
.background(Color.white.cornerRadius(8))

And surprise, this is what I got:

Isn’t that cool?

Although the final layout is exactly what I wanted, if you think about it, it’s not that intuitive that system uses tight placement for this and lax spacing for the one with the Rectangle.

In fact, as a developer, I’m not happy about not having direct control over the tightness of either layout or an obvious way to relate ZStack siblings. If there’s a way to describe how much content hugging I want in a ZStack layout and how to prioritize which item in that layout should guide the others, I haven’t discovered it. If you have, please let me know!

I’m still trying to learn to best use the deeply mysterious Length (and, no, don’t tell me “it’s just CGFloat“, because clearly it isn’t “just” that with all the Angle, Anchor, GeometryProxy, UnitPoint stuff,  and so forth) and apply layout relationships. Today, time allowing, I’d certainly like to learn more about the mysterious TupleView, a View created from a swift tuple of View values and see where it is used, the ForEach, which computes views on demand, Groups, EquatableView, and so forth.

SwiftUI: A little state

I wish I had more time to play. Here’s a little SwiftUI thing I threw together in the few moments I had free today. The source code is here.

Interestingly not including Color for backgrounds seems to kill my poor little sample. I suspect an overload where the type cannot be unambiguously inferred. Adding corner radiuses (shown here on the outside) destroys user interactivity. I have it commented out in the gist.

Originally, I tried to control state extrema (no negative inventory) in my model object but that led to a disconnect with the steppers. Instead, I finally found an initializer that allowed me to specify the valid range (in: range) to sanitize the user input, and disable the minus button for zero values.

A lot of the time I spent putting this together ended up with “helpful” results that looked like this:

That is to say, it’s really hard to provide a fluent functional framework in a typesafe language that feels like you’re constructing things into type erased collections because you never actually are…if that makes sense.

So far this week, I’ve managed to watch one video (the keynote) and about 20 minutes of another (the first bits introducing SwiftUI). I hope I have a chance to catch up. I’ll try to keep notes here on the website as I work through some of this stuff. It feels weird this year how far behind I am due to work commitments.

I spent today out of the office due to personal commitments and it’s been the first time I could really dive in (well, “dive” meaning for 10-20 minutes at a time here and there during the day). Loving this stuff, can’t wait to do more.

Good Things: SwiftUI on Mojave in iOS Playgrounds

Yes, you can upgrade to the Catalina Beta. Or, you can keep getting work done on Mojave and still enjoy the glory of SwiftUI exploration.

  1. Install Xcode 11 beta along side your 10.2.x Xcode
  2. Using the beta, create an iOS playground. (This won’t work with macOS, which attempts to use the native frameworks, which don’t  yet support SwiftUI)
  3. Import both SwiftUI and PlaygroundSupport.
  4. Set the live view to a UIHostingController instance whose rootView conforms to View.

Here’s an outline of the basic “Hello World” setup:

From there, you can create pages for each of your SwiftUI experiments, allowing you to build short, targeted applets to expand your exploration and understanding of the new technology.