Archive for the ‘OS X’ Category

WebsearchFodder: My mouse moves but won’t click

Weirdest thing this morning. My mouse stopped working right. I could move the cursor but not click the mouse. So I swapped it out for another mouse. Same problem. So I rebooted. Same problem. I then switched to a wireless mouse and then a Bluetooth one. Same problem across the board.

I won’t make you sit through all the problem solving that went on: same issue meant that this was not a mechanical error, and not tied to, for example, specific wires, or bulging batteries or whatever. The tl;dr is this: I had taken out a magic trackpad a few hours earlier, intending to use it (but never got around to it), and left it on a counter and a child had put something on top of it.

The magic trackpad had not only powered on but was continuously, due to the weight, issuing some sort of mouse press because of the weight of the stuff dumped on top of it. Once I took the weight off, everything started working again back at my computer.

Diagnostically: the cursor moves, any right-button works, any scroll wheel works, but not the left-button. Solution: hunt around for a wireless pointing device that might be interfering. If you have Screen Sharing enabled, you can disable Bluetooth and see if that resolves the problem.

I took the batteries out of the trackpad, and put it away gently.

I’m leaving this blog post in case it ever helps anyone else out on this very weird issue. The advice out there on the web all assumes a mechanical issue either with a built-in trackpad, with a pointing device, or a system issue. This was such a sideways situation that surely I can’t be the only person it will happen to but it probably most everyone will never be affected.

Making @KeyboardMaestro work in Mojave

Unfortunately, Apple seems to have messed up assistive apps like Keyboard Maestro in Mojave and if you depend on macros, that’s a very bad thing indeed. I upgraded to Mojave late last week (even though it is still not theoretically a GM) and found that although some actions still worked without problem like app launching others (specifically my universal Emacs key equivalents for arrow moves) did not.

I found this thread about the issue on a Keyboard Maestro forum. The hints on that thread helped me work out this solution to the Mojave problem. Note that you may have to repeat steps after rebooting your Mac.

  1. Copy /Applications/Keyboard\ Maestro.app/Contents/MacOS/Keyboard Maestro Engine.app to /Applications.
  2. In Terminal, kill the Keyboard Maestro and Engine processes.
  3. Open System Preferences > Security and Privacy > Accessibility. Grant privileges to both apps: Maestro and the copied Engine. (I also granted privileges to Finder and Safari, which probably wasn’t necessary.)
  4. Launch the Engine from /Applications. Check the process list for /Applications/Keyboard Maestro Engine.app/Contents/MacOS/Keyboard Maestro Engine and test your macros. You may have many types of macros and you’ll want to hit as many bits of the OS as possible when ensuring that each kind of macro is properly launched and executed.

 

How to check your security update

A macOS Security flaw opened access to users who didn’t have root passwords. So Apple updated computers overnight

Unfortunately Security Update 2017-001 turned out to bork file sharing, so Apple updated the problem both by issuing repair instructions and updating the patch.

To check whether you have the proper build, choose Apple Menu () > About This Mac. Click the System Report button and scroll down to Software. Click the word Software. You should be running 17B1003.

Thanks everyone.

p.s. Esopus Spitzenburg is my Mac mini. My MBP is Broxwood Foxwhelp. And yes, I’ve long since gone past Fuji, Gala, Rome, Honeycrisp, Pippin, Winter Banana, and many other varietals.

MacBook Pros and External Displays

Today, I hooked a newly purchased display to my MBP. (Looks like they’re out of stock right now, but it was $80 for 24″ when I bought it last week.) This isn’t intended to be my display. It’s replacing an old 14″ monitor for a kid. I thought I’d just steal it now and then during the day. It’s extremely lightweight and easy to move between rooms.

What I didn’t expect was how awful the text looked on it. I hooked up the monitor to the MBP using my Apple TV HDMI cable. The text was unreadable. I use similar TV-style monitors for my main system and they display text just fine. However, I’m using normal display ports and cables for my mini. This is the first time I’ve gone HDMI direct.

So off to websearch I went. Sure enough this is a known longstanding problem that many people have dealt with before. The MBP sees the TV as a TV and not a monitor. It produces a YUV signal instead of the RGB signal that improves text crispness. Pictures look pretty, text looks bad.

All the searches lead to this ruby script. The script builds a display override file containing a vendor and product ID with 4:4:4 RGB color support. The trick lies in getting macOS to install, read, and use it properly. That’s because you can’t install the file directly to /System/Library/Displays/Contents/Resources/Overrides/ in modern macOS. Instead, you have to disable “rootless”.

I wasn’t really happy about going into recovery mode. Disabling system integrity protection feels like overkill for a simple display issue. But it  worked.  It really only took a few minutes to resolve once I convinced myself it was worth doing. If you have any warnings and cautions about installing custom display overrides, please let me know. It  feels like I did something morally wrong even if it did fix my problem.

My external display went from being unusable to merely imperfect. The text is still a bit blurry but you can read it without inducing a migraine. Not nearly as crisp as normal display ports (which looks fine when used with this monitor) but I don’t have to buy a new cable and I don’t plan to use this much.

If I were going to use this monitor regularly with the MBP, I’d definitely purchase a proper cable. As it is, I’m happy enough to have found a workable-ish solution. The monitor is quite nice especially in “shop mode”, and has so far worked well with Chromecast, AppleTV, and Wii.

Why we develop

From my inbox:

I have been steadily using folderol in order to help me define which folders are important, as well as which ones are not.

Folderol has also been handy to me in developing subfolders within folders and having those subfolders be different colors, which helps me find the information inside of them quicker.

Thank you for developing such a great product.  If the folderol app is any indication of other products that you might have developed or that are in the development stage, I look forward to seeing what other applications you have.

Respectfully,

Demetrius Moyston

Folderol at the Mac App Store

Updating OSX beta: Lessons Learned

I wasted a lot of time yesterday and today until Mark Knopper pointed me to a solution for updating my beta by hand. Like others, my download had stalled at 151MB (of a 1+GB update) and I needed to just get the update done.

That solution thread linked to another developer forums post here. This thread contains links to manual downloads. Once you download the component pieces directly, you can move them into the stalled download in /Library/Updates, and then reboot and click Update in App Store.

I decided to complete all downloads, although some report you only have to install three of the four links. App Store sees the completed downloads, and installs and updates. I am now running Beta 2.

Some in that discussion thread have reported unstable systems after performing a manual upgrade. “I may have jinxed myself by asking, but after attempting to apply the packages willy nilly, it seems that my environment (16A201w on pro 3,1) is very unstable.  Safari is now crashing all the time.”

My A/C is broken and the repair person is about to arrive so I won’t have time to test my upgrade until later today or maybe early next week. If you do go this route, do so with extreme caution.

Bouncing AirDrop contents to my desktop

I never use my Downloads folder. It’s a fusion drive, so it’s precious, fast, and expensive. I don’t need a thousand downloaded copies of Xcode and firmware updates littering its limited space. Instead, I point all my browsers and other apps to download to my secondary data disk.

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And before you ask, I use numerical and alphabetic prefixes so everything shows up in the right place and the right order for quick reference and single-letter typing access. Whatever data I can offload from my main drive, I do offload:

Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 12.59.42 PM

However, when it comes to airdropping, it’s generally true that whatever I’m sending back and forth is of immediate interest. In such case, I don’t want it heading into my Downloads folder. I want it on my desktop as soon as it lands. As  I’m updating my Playgrounds Book right now, I’m doing a lot more airdropping than I normally would.

I’m not a big user of smart folders and Automator actions. I have a smallish bunch that I occasionally use. Still, they have their place and today was a perfect occasion to bring a new one into the mix.

I just had had it with the Downloads folder and decided to build a bouncer that would automatically throw any item added to ~/Downloads up to the desktop. I thought I’d share how to do this.

Step 1. Create a new Folder Action

Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 1.03.48 PM

Step 2. Choose the Downloads folder.

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Step 3. Drag “Move Finder Items” onto “Drag actions or files here to build your workflow”

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Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 1.06.48 PM

This creates the following action, with Desktop selected by default. (If it’s not, choose Desktop for the destination.)

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Step 4. Then save:

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Your new automator action is stored in ~/Library/Workflows/Applications/Folder\ Actions:

Screen Shot 2016-06-27 at 1.11.43 PM

Step 5. Test. Drop a file into Downloads and confirm that it moves to the desktop. You should now be ready to airdrop to your desktop.

Note: I’m sure there’s a better way to do this, but I actually wrote an app that quickly opens AirDrop windows on the Mac side of things. I found an appropriate AppleScript online, compiled it to an app, and use Spotlight to launch it. Very handy when I’m more focused on iOS than OS X at the moment.

Pinning tabs in Safari

Because sometimes people forget: Right-click the tab and choose Pin Tab from the pop-up. To remove a pinned tab, right-click again and either un-pin or close it.

Pinned tabs appear in all new tabbed browser windows as well.

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Weekend Posts

OS X Maps hint of the day

Want to grab the latest Maps data and don’t want to wait for updates? I’ve heard of a quick and easy solution, which is to delete ~/Library/Caches/GeoServices. This forces a cache flush and updates all your maps.

I noticed this might be especially handy today for those of you who use public transit in DC, Philly, Mexico City or Chicago.  Happy traveling all.