Archive for the ‘Bluetooth’ Category

Bluetooth Lessons II: Characteristics

Yesterday, I wrote about the basics involved in setting up a Bluetooth manager and scanning for available peripherals. The sample code left off after finding announced devices.

Last evening, I expanded this functionality to find a Mi wristband and execute a repeating vibration pattern. Today’s code is about four times longer and involves a lot more of the direct interaction with a BLE peripheral.

The changes start on finding a desired device. I looked at its peripheral.name, an optional value associated with a CBPeripheral. This approach is essentially the same as looking at SSIDs for WiFi. There’s not a lot of sophistication involved, and no pairing sequence. Once found, my code instructs the central manager to stop its scan (centralManager.stopScan()) and connect() to the matched peripheral.

At this point it’s really important that you do a few things:

  • Create a strong reference to the target peripheral. I used a property. Without this, the peripheral reference deallocates, as I found to my dismay.
  • Set the peripheral’s delegate, so you can monitor its callback routines, specifically centralManager(_:, didConnect:). You won’t be able to start the communication chain otherwise.

For the next step, request service discovery from the delegate callback. After the peripheral connects, call discoverServices(), and listen in peripheral(_:,didDiscoverServices:). At this point, the chain of command has passed from the manager that finds you the right peripheral, and moves to listening to the peripheral itself. Both components must establish delegation.

Today’s sample code uses a brute-force approach to find services, and then in the services callback, discover specific service characteristics (discoverCharacteristics(_:, for:)) for the device.

In production code, you’d limit these calls: supply a list of only those services and the characteristics (the actual API call points) you’re interested in. My code passes nil, because there aren’t that many calls for the target device and I don’t mind the extra overhead.

Like previous steps, characteristics have their own delegate method (peripheral(_:didDiscoverCharacteristicsFor:,error:)). Here’s where you can access and initialize specific actions that support those characteristics. I decided to use notifications to respond to the discovery of the vibration characteristic (“2A06”, an industry standard).

Notifications are short and sweet, especially for playgrounds. You won’t have to invest in designing protocols or implementing delegates. Just listen for the notification and then start doing whatever you need.

In this case, my open ended observer (it lives forever, so I don’t bother trying to save and release it) starts a vibration pattern by calling a custom type method startVibrating(degree:, delay:). This method writes request data to the peripheral’s characteristic, producing each vibration pattern on demand. The delay allows the vibration to repeat after an arbitrary number of seconds.

Like the peripheral, store your characteristics locally. Although they are characterized by a UUID, they aren’t meant to be built on the fly with raw UUID values — or at least not that I could find. Saving each characteristic for later reference appears to be a vital part of the set-up process.

At this point, I’ve pretty much taken this project where I need to. I can produce short and long vibration patterns, I’ve discovered the characteristic for direct vibration control (“FF05”, which appears to take a start and stop value), for testing the device (“FF0D”), and if I ever go that far, for pairing (“FF0F”).

I’m handing it off to my friend. Hopefully there’s enough functionality that he can perform buzzing-like therapy without further financial outlay.

Apparently, controlled buzzing has utility beyond (unconventional) autism therapy. There are any number of ADHD products built on the principle of re-focusing students back on-task every n minutes.

I suppose you could expand this as well with calendar integration for “take your meds” reminders or “get up and move around” ones, at a much lower price point than, for example, the full Apple Watch.

As for me, I discovered that I hate having anything on my wrists and that buzzing really gets on my nerves.  I’m glad I had the opportunity to play around with this, though.

If you end up building something interesting, please drop me a line and tell me about it.

Bluetooth Lessons I: Manager and Scanning

Last June, Izzy inspired me to do something with Bluetooth and playgrounds but honestly, I haven’t had the time and I couldn’t afford a Sphereo. I’ve wrapped up Swift Style. Attempting to write meaningfully about drawing while the Denver Public School system has for reasons I cannot begin to comprehend released my child to my recognizance for two entire weeks seems unlikely. (Another child has half days. Fun.)

To prepare, I purchased one of the cheapest BLE devices I could find, a Mi wristband (Amazon cost under $20 shipped), which has a reverse engineered API that lets you control vibration. A friend of mine just purchased the hugely expensive Buzzies for Autism bands. I’m  hoping I can mimic some of that functionality with a playground, a low-rent BLE device, and a full-price child.

Have I mentioned recently how awesome playgrounds are for playing around with and learning about new tech? They really are, especially because you can integrate just one concept at a time, and then test it live before expanding to the next.

I decided to go with Cocoa for my BLE exploration instead of iOS, although the tech is more or less the same on both platforms. When you work in Cocoa, using a macOS playground, the startup speed is phenomenal because you don’t have to work with a simulator.

My first project simply sets up a central manager (CBCentralManager), monitors its state, and lists any devices it finds. I’m pretty happy for this as a first day, not many hours to spend on it, playing around and doing something marginally useful result.

The CoreBluetooth documentation is pretty dire. For example, this is the Swift docs for CBManagerStatePoweredOn.  After SE-0005, the constant is actually .poweredOn, as you see in the following sample code, not CBManagerStatePoweredOn. And there’s no documentation in that documentation.

Nonetheless, I persevered and my first child-full day produced a basic helper class. You really need to work in NSObject land for this because of all the delegation. So I set up an objc-friendly class, set it as a manager delegate, and implemented the one required callback method, which follows the manger state.

Try sticking the Bluetooth icon in your system menu bar.  (System Preferences > Bluetooth > Show Bluetooth in menu bar.) It’s a lot of fun to toggle it on and off and watch your playground keep tabs on that state.

Next, I added a basic peripheral scan. You need to scan only when the manager achieves poweredOn state.

Apple writes, “Before you call CBCentralManager methods, the state of the central manager object must be powered on, as indicated by the CBCentralManagerStatePoweredOn constant. This state indicates that the central device (your iPhone or iPad, for instance) supports Bluetooth low energy and that Bluetooth is on and available to use.”

That’s why I added the scan to the playground’s “update state” callback. You’ll want to stop scans when the BLE powers off.

Finally, I implemented one more callback, which asynchronously lists discovered peripherals. It picked up nicely on my Apple TV and when I enabled and disabled a hotspot on my iPhone. Great fun.

Here’s the code involved. You can see how very short it is. The struggle wasn’t in the lines of code or complexity, it’s mostly about how very badly documented most everything seems to be.

I’ll post more as time allows.

https://gist.github.com/erica/d249ff13aec353e8a8d72a1f5e77d3f8