Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

Swift 4: Release Process and Phase 2

Release Process

The Swift 4 release process targets Fall 2017:

Swift 4 is a major release that is intended to be completed in the fall of 2017. It pivots around providing source stability for Swift 3 code while implementing essential feature work needed to achieve binary stability in the language. It will contain significant enhancements to the core language and Standard Library, especially in the generics system and a revamp of the String type. More details can be found on the Swift Evolution page.

Swift 4 Phase 2

The Swift 4 two-stage release plan was established in July 2016: focusing on essentials and ABI stability.  Swift  4 only focuses on Phase 1 at this time. Stage 2 starts now.

All design work and discussion for stage 2 extends to April 1, 2017. The intent is to timebox discussion to provide adequate time for the actual implementation of accepted proposals.

Deferred ABI and Status Updates

Ted Kremenek writes,

Since July, we now have a much better understanding now of how to achieve ABI stability, with an ABI Manifesto https://github.com/apple/swift/blob/master/docs/ABIStabilityManifesto.md detailing the list of all language/implementation work that is needed to achieve ABI stability. We have made substantial progress in that work during stage 1, but much remains to be done. Once Swift achieves ABI stability the ABI can be extended, but not changed. Thus the cost of locking down an ABI too early is quite high.

Deferring ABI stability enables Swift to focus on language fundamentals. An ABI dashboard will be wired up from the Swift Evolution Github repository. This will present a table of remaining ABI tasks and display their status.

Foundation

Swift Foundation API improvements are folded under the phase 2 umbrella, “to continue the goal of making the Cocoa SDK work seamlessly in Swift. Details on the specific goals will be provided as we get started on Swift 4 stage 2.”

Unimplemented Proposals

The following accepted proposals are rolled forward into Swift 4 Stage 2:

  • SE-0104 “Protocol-oriented Integers”: This proposal requires revision and another round of review based on other changes that have been made to the language and standard library since acceptance.
  • SE-0075 “Adding a Build Configuration Import Test”: This is (still) an additive proposal and no other changes affect this proposal. It will be carried forward and considered accepted for Swift 4.
  • SE-0042 “Flattening the function type of unapplied method references”: This proposal requires another round of review. This is a significant source-breaking change, and the bar for such source-breaking changes is considerably higher in Swift 4 than it was in Swift 3.
  • SE-0068 “Expanding Swift Self to class members and value types”: This is (still) an additive proposal and no other changes affect this proposal. It will be carried forward and considered accepted for Swift 4.

Links

Swift Style: Now Available for Amazon Pre-Order

Swift Style is almost wrapped up. I’m just waiting for some final copy edits. Notably, pre-orders are live on Amazon. (You can ignore the dates, page counts, etc there. They’re just place-fillers.) I just did a product video for Amazon, which hopefully will be posted over the next few weeks.

Once printed, Style will be on sale at all the major retailers as well as at Pragmatic. Pragmatic gives you the option of hybrid ebook/printed bundles, and gives me a slightly better slice of the royalty pie, if that matters to you. It’s a nice thing for me.

I’ll be remote talking about the book and Swift Style at PlaygroundsCon on the 24th (the 23rd in the US) this month and Forward Swift 2 on March 2. I also recently gave a talk at Realm’s Swift user SLUG meetup, which you can watch by following the link earlier in this sentence.

That’s not to say this project is done. Swift Style evolved from talking to developers. It represents viewpoints from the larger Swift development community. That process can and will continue as people read the book and I expand its guidance. The people at Pragmatic have been lovely in helping me plan out the book’s future as well as its present.

Apple Swift team undergoes reorganization

Statement from Chris Lattner:

Since Apple launched Swift at WWDC 2014, the Swift team has worked closely with our developer community.  When we made Swift open source and launched Swift.org we put a lot of effort into defining a strong community structure.  This structure has enabled Apple and the amazingly vibrant Swift community to work together to evolve Swift into a powerful, mature language powering software used by hundreds of millions of people.

I’m happy to announce that Ted Kremenek will be taking over for me as “Project Lead” for the Swift project, managing the administrative and leadership responsibility for Swift.org.  This recognizes the incredible effort he has already been putting into the project, and reflects a decision I’ve made to leave Apple later this month to pursue an opportunity in another space.  This decision wasn’t made lightly, and I want you all to know that I’m still completely committed to Swift.  I plan to remain an active member of the Swift Core Team, as well as a contributor to the swift-evolution mailing list.

Working with many phenomenal teams at Apple to launch Swift has been a unique life experience.  Apple is a truly amazing place to be able to assemble the skills, imagination, and discipline to pull something like this off.  Swift is in great shape today, and Swift 4 will be a really strong release with Ted as the Project Lead.

Note that this isn’t a change to the structure – just to who sits in which role – so we don’t expect it to impact day-to-day operations in the Swift Core Team in any significant way.  Ted and I wanted to let you know what is happening as a part of our commitment to keeping the structure of Swift.org transparent to our community.

-Chris

The Swift project is driven by a core team of Apple engineers:

The core team “reviews and helps iterate on language evolution proposals from the community at large, acting as the approver of these proposals. Team members help drive Swift forward in a coherent direction consistent with the goal of creating the best possible general purpose programming language.” They are appointed by the project lead.

Buy a book: Swift Style

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I’m happy to announce that Swift Style has gone into beta release at  the Pragmatic Bookshelf. My book is now ready for sale as part of their beta program. This program gives you early access to the book’s material as I work on it.

Be part of the writing process. Beta access enables you to offer feedback as I finish writing:

Before a book gets to the final, ready-to-publish state, it normally looks quite rough. It will have hundreds of typos and grammatical errors. It’s likely to have technical errors that would normally get corrected in a final read-through by reviewers. And it’ll certainly look fairly ugly—we don’t do any layout work until just prior to sending a book to the printer, so there will be widows, orphans, text split across page turns and so on.

As you find mistakes or technical errors, if want to argue for or against a style rule, or you’d like to submit an enhancement suggestion,  click the Report Erratum link on the book’s home page. If you have any in-depth feedback (either positive or negative) that goes beyond the scope of the erratum page, drop me an email. Enable notifications so you receive an email whenever the book updates.

Swift Style: Beta Book

Self-Published Books

Thank you for your support!

Swift Style Update

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I finished the first draft today. It’s about 160 pages long, which is a bit longer than I expected. I’ll be revising and tweaking coverage next. If there are any specific style issues you want me to research and/or address please let me know now.

Also, if you’ve purchased any of my self-published titles, please make sure you have the latest versions. The current revision is always listed in the first section with the legal stuff and “Distributed worldwide by Erica Sadun”. The current versions are:

  • Swift Two to Three: 1.0.2
  • Swift Documentation Markup: 2.0
  • Playground Secrets and Power Tips: 3.5

If you do not have the right version, check for available downloads in iTunes or download the latest version from Leanpub.

Here’s the current Table of Contents for the book. If you noticed, I’m using a brand new toolchain for writing so I’ve got a much better ToC than I have had in the previous “Swift. Slowly.” titles:

 

Fixed floating point strides

In case you haven’t noticed, Xiaodi Wu fixed floating point strides in the latest version of Swift.

You can read about the background of the problem here but to tl;dr summarize it, the traditional C for-loop had a big problem with floating point progressions. Errors accumulated the longer the loop ran. That problem then passed into Swift strides.

This issue is now fixed and the error at the end of stride(from:0.0, through: 1.0, by: 0.05) is now no larger than it was at the start. Yay!