Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

Apple Swift team undergoes reorganization

Statement from Chris Lattner:

Since Apple launched Swift at WWDC 2014, the Swift team has worked closely with our developer community.  When we made Swift open source and launched Swift.org we put a lot of effort into defining a strong community structure.  This structure has enabled Apple and the amazingly vibrant Swift community to work together to evolve Swift into a powerful, mature language powering software used by hundreds of millions of people.

I’m happy to announce that Ted Kremenek will be taking over for me as “Project Lead” for the Swift project, managing the administrative and leadership responsibility for Swift.org.  This recognizes the incredible effort he has already been putting into the project, and reflects a decision I’ve made to leave Apple later this month to pursue an opportunity in another space.  This decision wasn’t made lightly, and I want you all to know that I’m still completely committed to Swift.  I plan to remain an active member of the Swift Core Team, as well as a contributor to the swift-evolution mailing list.

Working with many phenomenal teams at Apple to launch Swift has been a unique life experience.  Apple is a truly amazing place to be able to assemble the skills, imagination, and discipline to pull something like this off.  Swift is in great shape today, and Swift 4 will be a really strong release with Ted as the Project Lead.

Note that this isn’t a change to the structure – just to who sits in which role – so we don’t expect it to impact day-to-day operations in the Swift Core Team in any significant way.  Ted and I wanted to let you know what is happening as a part of our commitment to keeping the structure of Swift.org transparent to our community.

-Chris

The Swift project is driven by a core team of Apple engineers:

The core team “reviews and helps iterate on language evolution proposals from the community at large, acting as the approver of these proposals. Team members help drive Swift forward in a coherent direction consistent with the goal of creating the best possible general purpose programming language.” They are appointed by the project lead.

Buy a book: Swift Style

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I’m happy to announce that Swift Style has gone into beta release at  the Pragmatic Bookshelf. My book is now ready for sale as part of their beta program. This program gives you early access to the book’s material as I work on it.

Be part of the writing process. Beta access enables you to offer feedback as I finish writing:

Before a book gets to the final, ready-to-publish state, it normally looks quite rough. It will have hundreds of typos and grammatical errors. It’s likely to have technical errors that would normally get corrected in a final read-through by reviewers. And it’ll certainly look fairly ugly—we don’t do any layout work until just prior to sending a book to the printer, so there will be widows, orphans, text split across page turns and so on.

As you find mistakes or technical errors, if want to argue for or against a style rule, or you’d like to submit an enhancement suggestion,  click the Report Erratum link on the book’s home page. If you have any in-depth feedback (either positive or negative) that goes beyond the scope of the erratum page, drop me an email. Enable notifications so you receive an email whenever the book updates.

Swift Style: Beta Book

Self-Published Books

Thank you for your support!

Swift Style Update

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I finished the first draft today. It’s about 160 pages long, which is a bit longer than I expected. I’ll be revising and tweaking coverage next. If there are any specific style issues you want me to research and/or address please let me know now.

Also, if you’ve purchased any of my self-published titles, please make sure you have the latest versions. The current revision is always listed in the first section with the legal stuff and “Distributed worldwide by Erica Sadun”. The current versions are:

  • Swift Two to Three: 1.0.2
  • Swift Documentation Markup: 2.0
  • Playground Secrets and Power Tips: 3.5

If you do not have the right version, check for available downloads in iTunes or download the latest version from Leanpub.

Here’s the current Table of Contents for the book. If you noticed, I’m using a brand new toolchain for writing so I’ve got a much better ToC than I have had in the previous “Swift. Slowly.” titles:

 

Fixed floating point strides

In case you haven’t noticed, Xiaodi Wu fixed floating point strides in the latest version of Swift.

You can read about the background of the problem here but to tl;dr summarize it, the traditional C for-loop had a big problem with floating point progressions. Errors accumulated the longer the loop ran. That problem then passed into Swift strides.

This issue is now fixed and the error at the end of stride(from:0.0, through: 1.0, by: 0.05) is now no larger than it was at the start. Yay!

Announcing tmdiff

For all I know this already exists and I just was unable to google it up. Assuming it doesn’t, tmdiff allows you to perform a command line diff on a text file against a time machine version.

Repo: https://github.com/erica/tmdiff

Usage:

Usage: tmdiff (--list)
       tmdiff [offset: 1] path

The list option just lists the dates for the backups in reverse chronological order. Supply a path to diff, e.g.

tmdiff Style600-Control\ Flow.md

It defaults to using the “but last” backup offset of 1. If you want to use the most recent backup, use 0 instead, or any number moving further back in time as the value increases:

tmdiff 0 Style600-Control\ Flow.md
tmdiff 3 Style600-Control\ Flow.md

I hope this is handy for someone out there on the opposite side of the Intertube, especially since version control is baked into stuff like TextEdit. Do let me know if you use it.

Update: See also github.com/erica/tmls and github.com/erica/tmcp. The former runs ls, complete with arguments. The latter performs a nondestructive copy with the Time Machine date appended.

My terrible no good horrible updating day

Good news: There should be an updated version of Playground Secrets awaiting iBooks customers. Apple is looking into why my updates over the summer did not get relayed to customers. This issue does not affect anyone who bought from LeanPub.

Expect another Playground Secrets update soon beyond this. I’m still tweaking to the final Xcode/Swift 3 release. Look for revision 3.5 to debut shortly. It will have “Swift 3, Xcode 8” at the very top.

Good news: I’m also updating Documentation Markup. A preview of some of the changes I address is here. I’m probably going to include at least some of the points I made in my essay about past you and future you.

Good news: The response to the Swift Celebration Bundle has been so strong that I’m extending the sale until at least the end of this week. Thank you everyone!

Bad news: Some nice Xcode features have gone away. Remember this, which picked up information from the structured markup?

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It’s now gone. Xcode no longer shows the abstract for the selected match.

Badder news: Xcode fuzzy completion is so relaxed and shows so much stuff that it can be really hard to find the API you actually want. There can be literally dozens of pages of completions for certain APIs.

Good news: After months of going back and forth with Bluehost technical support, they seem to have finally found something slowing down responsiveness. Hopefully this site will be slightly zippier. Not promising great responsive time but there should be fewer 504 errors and database errors and timeouts.

Helpful non-news: Make sure you check your iTunes Connect account to review your old applications. Not all notices are getting sent about the 30-day “you must update this old app” period. If you have some older titles, take some time to check on them.

Helpful extremely non-news: For whatever reasons, you must adhere to standard iTunes Connect dimensions when uploading Book screenshots. The books side of things won’t tell you what they are, but they are: 1024×768, 1024×748, 768×1024, 768×1004, 2048×1536, 2048×1496, 1536×2048, 1536×2008.

Swift From Two to Three on iTunes and Leanpub

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Swift 3 is a major, breaking language change. Are you ready to make the jump? Let “Swift from Two to Three” help you along the way. From migrating your code, updating your style, and adopting new Swift features, this book ushers you into the newly refreshed language. Learn what changed, why it changed, and how you can update your code using this hands-on guide that covers all the major difference with plenty of examples and insight.

Now available from iTunes and Leanpub. Buy all three and save 30%.

Sending a sincere thank you to everyone who helps support my blogging and independent writing by purchasing books.

Swift 3.0 is released

Raise a glass, everyone! Ted Kremenek writes on swift.org

Swift 3.0, the first major release of Swift since it was open-sourced, is now officially released! Swift 3 is a huge release containing major improvements and refinements to the core language and Standard Library, major additions to the Linux port of Swift, and the first official release of the Swift Package Manager.

Congrats to the whole Swift Team and all the volunteers on Swift Evolution, Swift Dev, Swift Build Dev, and everyone else who pitched into the effort.

I’m finishing up edits on Swift 2 to 3, and it should hit the Bookstore within the next few days.