WWDC Thoughts

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 12.42.33 PM

This year, Apple offered a particularly subdued WWDC keynote introducing refreshes along all its product lines with few surprises or innovations. While the audience was politely enthusiastic, I’m not sure the tech press will be wowed.

I love the iOS playgrounds, although I think this is a better opportunity for institutions (say, Stanford) than little tutorial writers, and I got Sherlocked. Xcode introduces source editor extensions and there’s a Siri API using extensions.

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 1.06.26 PM

The download and upgrade process for Xcode, OS X (I mean macOS), and iOS has been amazing — just a dream process compared to previous years. Everything is operating smoothly from updating the conference schedule to providing bandwidth for desperate developer downloads. Fingers crossed this continues as well as it has started. I’m amazed at how clean the download site is, how simple the configuration profile approach is working (“Can I temporarily remove some large apps for space and re-install them later?” “Why YES!”). Big applause to whoever made these improvements.

Looking forward to the state of the union later today.

Swift:

Tuesday

  • What’s new in Swift: Tues 11-11:40
  • Getting Started with Swift: Tues 2:40 – 3:40
  • What’s new in Foundation for Swift: Tues 5 – 5:40
  • What’s new in LLVM: Tues 6-6:40

Wednesday

  • Introducing Swift Playgrounds: Weds 12-1
  • Modern Best Practices: Weds 4-4:40
  • Swiftogether: Weds 7:15-8:45

Thursday

  • Using and Extending Xcode’s Source Editor: Thus 6-6:40

Friday

  • Server-side with Swift Open Source: Fri 10-10:40
  • Swift Performance: Fri 12-1
  • Debugging Tips & Tricks: Fri: 2:40 – 3:40
  • Concurrent GCD w/ Swift: Fri 5-5:40
  • Protocol and Value Oriented Programing (in UIKit Apps): 5-5:40

Not Swift:

  • What’s new in Cocoa: Tues 12-1
  • What’s new in Cocoa Touch: Tues 2:40-3:40
  • Typography and Fonts: Weds 10-10:40
  • Speech Recognition API: Weds 5-5 (!?)
  • Intro to SiriKit: Weds 6-7
  • Extending Apps with SiriKit: Thus 2:40-3:40
  • What’s new in GameplayKit: Thus 10 – 10:40
  • Making Apps Adaptive: Thus 12-12:40, Fri 10-10:40
  • Proactive Suggestions: Fri: 2:40-3:40
  • Measurements and Units: Fri 5-5:40

Also: Some nice internationalization and accessibility sessions, a couple of worthy “adopting Metal” sessions, CloudKit best practices

iOS 10 Compatible Devices

I think this is probably the most reliable screenshot:

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 1.43.05 PM

There’s also this:

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 12.46.07 PM

and this:

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 1.46.51 PM

macOS Sierra Compatible Devices

Screen Shot 2016-06-13 at 1.59.25 PM

 

One Comment

  • Well, shit. I guess I have to pay thousands of dollars for a new Mac now.

    I wonder why the 2009 Mac Pro is no longer supported, but the 2010 is. Same EFI, same chipset and kernel mode, same CPU (with a very slightly slower clock), same bus, same base memory (though I’m sure everybody has upgraded this), same external connectivity. They both shipped with spinning-metal disks (though I’m sure everybody has upgraded to SSDs by now, too). The 2010 had a nicer graphics card, but its graphics card was a common upgrade for the 2009, as well, and the entry 2009 Mac Pro still had a far better graphics system than the 2009 iMac — not to mention, the 2010 MacBook Air!

    On paper, I see no significant difference between the 2009 and 2010 Mac Pro which would justify drawing the line between them. Any clues from WWDC?